A Good Writing Day

 Posted by at 12:32 am  Nick's Blog
May 252024
 

It was too hot to get much of anything done outside yesterday, which made it a good day to stay inside and write, so that’s what I did. And of course, writing also involves research as I’m going along, especially with the Tinder Street series, making sure I get the historical timeline down correctly. And in the process, I always find interesting rabbit holes to go down.

One of them yesterday was about pioneering aviatrixes Jackie Cochran and Nancy Love, who while working separately, convinced the powers that be that women pilots could play a vital role in the war effort against Japan and Germany. Their combined efforts put women in the cockpits of airplanes that needed to be ferried from one location to another, freeing male pilots for combat duty. The Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) served as civilians in the US Army Air Forces from September 1942 to December 1944. This evolved into the Women in the Air Force (WAF) in 1948. The WAF program continued until 1976, when the Air Force began accepting women on an equal basis with men.

I had a friend, who has since passed away, whose mother was one of the pilots flying fighter planes and bombers from factories and different airfields to bases around the country during World War II, and I always loved hearing her stories. If you would like to learn some of their stories yourself, check out the fascinating book The Women With Silver Wings on Amazon. I think you’ll find it very interesting.

Even with getting distracted by the contributions of the brave women pilots, I still managed to get close to 5,000 words written yesterday. As I said, a good writing day.

And is there a better way to end a good writing day than with some of the Miss Terry’s delicious cooking? I don’t think so. Last night she made beer battered swai, along with crispy parmesan potatoes, and side veggies. Yummy!

Be sure to enter our latest Free Drawing. This week’s prize is an audiobook of Big Lake Honeymoon, the seventh book in my Big Lake mystery series. The busy summer season is drawing to a close in the little mountain town of Big Lake, Arizona and the locals are looking forward to a relaxing interlude before the first snowfall brings carloads of skiers to the high country. That all changes when a nearly nude woman rushes into a convenience store in the middle of the night begging for help. She tells Sheriff Jim Weber that her new husband has been murdered and she was taken captive by the mysterious killer, who seems to have disappeared into the thick forests of the White Mountains, touching off a manhunt for a phantom that cannot be found.

To enter, click on this Free Drawing link or the tab at the top of this page and enter your name (first and last) in the comments section at the bottom of that page (not this one). Only one entry per person per drawing please, and you must enter with your real name. To prevent spam or multiple entries, the names of cartoon or movie characters are not allowed. The winner will be drawn Sunday evening. Note: Due to the high shipping cost of printed books and Amazon restrictions on e-books to foreign countries, only entries with US addresses and e-mail addresses are allowed. After 30 days, unclaimed prizes revert back to the drawing pool for a future contest.

And finally, here’s a chuckle to start your day from the collection of funny signs we see in our travels and that our readers share with us.

 Thought For The Day – I’m attracted to intelligence, not education. You could graduate from the most elite college, but if you’re clueless about the world and society, you don’t know anything.

Nick Russell

World-Famous, New York Times Best Selling Author, and All-Around Nice Guy!

  One Response to “A Good Writing Day”

  1. i recently went to JOE PATTI’S SEAFOOD and blue crab meat was $45/lb –

    so ‘cheap me’ bought $6/lb shrimp

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