Barn Project Part 4

 Posted by at 12:50 am  Nick's Blog
Jan 302024
 

In yesterday’s blog, I told you that on Sunday our son Travis and I started taking down a wall to access a room in the barn that was not being used, to give me more space for my Kubota tractor and other equipment. By the end of the day, we had the plywood off both sides of the wall, with just the 2×4 studs and ceiling still standing.

The first order of business yesterday was to see what was on top of the ceiling and what would be involved in taking it down. As I said before, the room is freestanding and not part of the structural integrity of the barn itself. I used the forklift safety cage to lift Travis up so he could check it out. We thought there would be a plywood over the ceiling joists that we would have to cut through, but all there was up there were a few plastic chicken waterers from the days when this was a chicken farm, and several inches of dust and deteriorated insulation.

The good news was that we would not have to cut through two separate layers of plywood, one on each side of the ceiling. The bad news was all that dust up there was going to be a real mess to deal with.

As he did with the wall, Travis used a reciprocating saw to cut sections of the plywood out between the ceilng joists so we could salvage them for other projects.

Each time he cut through a section, an avalanche of dust and insulation came down.

He tried to dodge it, but didn’t have a whole lot of luck with that. Before long the poor guy looked like a cross between the Abominable Snowman and Mr. Dirt. I wouldn’t have blamed him at all if he quit right then, but he’s a trooper and he kept right at it.

Even with all the stuff that fell down, there was still more up there, and I used a long piece of wood to knock it loose so it would come down.

It was more than ankle deep by the time we had it all down.

Then we took down the wall joists and ceiling joists. By the time we had that done, we had quite a mess, but the room was essentially opened up.

There are a lot of old electrical wires that are not connected to anything that have to come down and quite a bit of trim work that has to be done at some point. But once we get everything cleaned up, I can start moving things around and getting the barn more organized.

I keep saying we, but the truth is Travis did 90% of the actual work. He tells me he loves doing stuff like that and learns something new with every project. I think the lesson for this project was that Dad can get you into some real messes if you’re not careful.

While we were busy with that, Terry was inside doing month end paperwork and also editing and proofreading another six chapters in my new book, Big Lake Accident. The story is moving right along, and she tells me she likes it and she’s sure my readers will, too.

And finally, here’s a chuckle to start your day from the collection of funny signs we see in our travels and that our readers share with us. If the trucks are too chicken to get on the road, maybe they should stay parked in the yard.

Thought For The Day – Prioritize your mental health. Schedule your meltdowns in advance.

Nick Russell

World-Famous, New York Times Best Selling Author, and All-Around Nice Guy!

  3 Responses to “Barn Project Part 4”

  1. If you’ve ever gotten behind a chicken truck during your travels, you’d really appreciate that warning. Between the splattered chicken poop and the flying feathers that stick to your windshield (and entire rig) it’s wise to just pull off the road and wait a while for it all to settle. Speaking from first-hand experience 😉

  2. It looks like you guys are trying to shorten your life. You can get hazmat suits coveralls in any hardware store. You should be wearing them You should be using a respirator mask no face mask. You guys Keep an eye on your health Respiratory and skin for the next 3 to 4 days
    Direct contact with fiberglass or breathing airborne dust containing fiberglass may irritate the skin, eyes, nose, and throat. The symptoms of irritation are often nonspecific, temporary, and may include itching, coughing, or wheezing
    Overview. Histoplasmosis is an infection caused by breathing in spores of a fungus often found in bird and bat droppings. People usually get it from breathing in these spores when they become airborne during demolition or cleanup projects.

  3. Looks like you guys are trying to shorten your life You can get hazmat suits coveralls in any hardware store. You should be wearing them You should be using a respirator mask no face mask. You guys Keep an eye on your health Respiratory and skin for the next 3 to 4 days
    Direct contact with fiberglass or breathing airborne dust containing fiberglass may irritate the skin, eyes, nose, and throat. The symptoms of irritation are often nonspecific, temporary, and may include itching, coughing, or wheezing
    Overview. Histoplasmosis is an infection caused by breathing in spores of a fungus often found in bird and bat droppings. People usually get it from breathing in these spores when they become airborne during demolition or cleanup projects.

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