Mar 172012
 

Yesterday we were very busy doing absolutely nothing at all. Or, while doing nothing at all, we managed to keep very busy. I’m not exactly sure which it was.

Terry and I slept in late, which was a real treat after having to be up early so much lately, and after we were up for a while, I dumped our holding tanks. Later on, we walked over to Greg and Jan’s motorhome, where Jan treated us to some delicious breakfast croissants. Yummy! Greg had recorded several episodes of The Big Bang Theory, one of our favorite sitcoms, and we watched 2 or 3 while we visited with two of our best friends in the world.

Eventually we came back to the Winnebago, and I started going through e-mails. I was excited to see one from my friend Al Hesselbart, historian for the RV Museum in Elkhart, Indiana. As many of you know, looming debt and the poor economy have left the Museum teetering on the brink of disaster for quite some time now. Al’s e-mail included a press release stating that an agreement has been worked out with the museum’s major creditors to ensure that this valuable resource for the RV community will be able to keep its doors open and continue to welcome visitors. I was quite relieved because we love the museum and look forward to visiting it every year when we get back to Elkhart.

I also had a press release from Walter Cannon of the Recreational Vehicle Safety Education Foundation (RVSEF). RVSEF has just released a new DVD featuring one of Walter’s most requested seminars, Understanding and Testing Your Motorhome’s Air Brakes. The DVD displays a detailed, hands-on section, which walks the RV owner, step-by-step, through the three important tests all coach owners should perform, as well as explaining how the air brake system actually functions. The DVD is generic and applicable to any motorhome equipped with air brakes. The DVD is available through the RVSEF website, www.rvsafety.com, by telephone at (321) 453-7673 or by e-mailing RVSEF at [email protected]. The price is $19.95, plus shipping and handling.

I spent most of the afternoon writing, which is my job but is also very relaxing to me. I wrote a new post for my self-publishing blog titled Are You Just An Author?, and completed the first chapter of my new book, Crazy Days in Big Lake, and printed it out for Miss Terry to look over. She gave me some suggestions to tighten it up a bit and after I did that she reread it and said she likes it. That’s a good thing!

While I was busy writing, Terry was busy working on all the paperwork from our Yuma rally, as well as trying to fill some orders that came in with our mail the other day. She made a dent in it, but there’s a lot more to go. We have some refunds to send out to people who had to cancel at the last minute, and hopefully by the end of the coming week she will be able to balance the rally books for the rally and see if we at least broke even. I sure know we didn’t make much, if any at all, but working that hard to lose money would really suck. 🙁

A little after 4 PM, we rode into town with Greg and Jan and stopped at Bookman’s, a popular used bookstore with several locations in Tucson, as well as one in Mesa and another in Flagstaff. Even though all four of us have Kindles, we just can’t pass up a bookstore. Especially a used bookstore with a fabulous selection! I picked up a couple of travel reference books, and found a used DVD set of the first season of Picket Fences, a quirky TV series that I got hooked on back when it was in production several years ago. I’d love to find DVDs of other seasons of the show, but haven’t had any luck yet.

Greg, Jan, and Terry were in the mood for Mexican food, so we stopped at a little hole in the wall place called Poco & Mom’s that is a favorite with all three of them. The place doesn’t look all that impressive from the outside but the food is really good, and every time we come to Tucson we eat there at least once. Since everything they make has onions in it, which I’m very allergic to, I settled for a cheeseburger and fries. Better safe than sorry.

Back at the fairgrounds, we bid Greg and Jan goodnight and came inside, where I answered some e-mails and checked in with some Internet forums I read regularly, while Miss Terry was working on our mailing list. So all in all, we kept busy all day but it was still a lot more relaxed than most of the days we’ve had in the last few weeks. A winter storm is coming through Arizona and the next few days are supposed to be windy and much colder. Except for driving into town to visit with my cousin Bev, there’s nothing we really have to do tomorrow, so we’re looking forward to another laid-back day, busy doing nothing. 🙂

Thought For The Day – Formal education will make you a living; self-education will make you a fortune.

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Nick Russell

World-Famous, New York Times Best Selling Author, and All-Around Nice Guy!

  4 Responses to “A Busy Day Doing Nothing”

  1. Doing nothing on a busy day or a busy day doing nothing reminds me of a friend that always like to take a rest after a good long sleep-as long as we ENJOY doing what we are doing with stepping some else’s foot it is OK.

  2. Nick, thanks for the RV Museum update. You helped me contact them a while back in regards to donating a very old fishing rod and reel for display It belonged to my dad and I know he would be happy to see it there for others to enjoy. On a second note…we sure enjoy the Cubans at the little cafe on Rt 41 near Spring Hill, Fl. Miss Terry, the deep friend pork is also pretty darn good. Travel safe my friends

  3. Doing nothing is actually very healthy – it’s how you recharge your batteries. So do not feel bad about that my friend….it’s good for you.

  4. I meant “Not stepping on some one’s foot”…….
    Sorry for that.

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